For Mollie…

For weeks the people of Iowa – in fact, people across the country – have become familiar with the smiling face of Mollie Tibbetts. Yesterday we learned that Mollie will not be coming home. Her lifeless body was found in a field, the victim of evil and violence, which seems to pervade our world more deeply each day. What do we say and think of such a loss; such a manifestation of evil and suffering? As Christians who worship God revealed in the suffering of the cross, there is much to say, really. In summary I’ll quote a colleague, Arthur Bergren, a pastor in Waverly, Iowa: “In the field where this young woman was recovered, the cross of Christ stands. Mollie was never alone.” Her tears, pain, terror – whatever she suffered – was suffered in the very heart of God. That God will not let this suffering be the final word for Mollie, for her family, or for us.

Sadly, Mollie is fast becoming a footnote to this story. Instead of grief and honoring the dead, political leaders, media outlets and many others have jumped on the fact that the alleged perpetrator of this crime was an immigrant who was in this country illegally. The death of a young woman is being used for political purposes and scapegoating. The young man who stands accused of the murder is in custody and charged. The system of justice is in motion. If convicted, he will pay for his crime in ways that have been mandated by the people.

Will using this woman’s death to rally people to purge our nation of immigrants ensure that this kind of violence will never happen again? Hardly. If we hunt down the illegal immigrants (and in the process every person who speaks Spanish or is a little browner than we are) will we be able to sleep in a deluded peace, sure that violence cannot touch us? Hardly. Should we look at common sense immigration practices that don’t throw the “baby out with the bath water” as we act? I hope so. Should we, in this moment, mourn Mollie, comfort those who grieve and try not to objectify this young woman any more than she has been for our own causes? I pray so.
Here’s the thing: In 1986, Mark Smith waited for his ex-girlfriend to come home from school after he had broken into her home. When she arrived, he stabbed her 66 times. Mark Smith was not an illegal immigrant; he was not unusual. He and his family lived in a house just adjacent to my parent’s home. Jenny Crompton died for no real reason. Simple human brokenness and sin were at the heart of the act. Mark Smith was convicted and is in jail to this day – a recent appeal, denied.

My point is that we cannot live in this world and believe that senseless violence and suffering will not happen if we can identify the “bad people” – be they illegal immigrants or our normal neighbors, or even us. You know the down-deep, center of your soul truth, don’t you? Every one of us is capable of becoming Cain or Abel, perpetrator or victim. That is why we need a God who enters into our existence – even the suffering and death – to transform us and share our pain.

So, I’m just asking us to keep this loss, this tragic and senseless murder, focused on Mollie and her family. That we pray for the justice system to work. That we set aside our agendas and our need to pick up our torches and search for the monsters – because they are all of us, friends. I’m asking that we keep our heads, watch our mouths and open our hearts – for Mollie. That is this Beggar’s Take on Mollie’s death.

copyright 2018 – Timothy V. Olson

Author: Pastor Tim Olson

Husband, father, pastor, beggar, full-time saint, full-time sinner

21 thoughts on “For Mollie…”

  1. Well said, may Mollie RIP and may her family and friends all her loved ones find peace in their hearts ♥️. God bless

  2. This was a wonderful commentary on Mollie. I especially appreciated the picture it was posted under. It reminded me of the verse,” for now we see through a glass darkly, but then face to face”. I trust Mollie is enjoying the view.

  3. With respect, I must disagree with a portion of your post, which I noted in an earlier reply and which you chose not to include in the comments. The part I disagree with is this: “Will using this woman’s death to rally people to purge our nation of immigrants ensure that this kind of violence will never happen again? Hardly. If we hunt down the illegal immigrants (and in the process every person who speaks Spanish or is a little browner than we are) will we be able to sleep in a deluded peace, sure that violence cannot touch us? Hardly. Should we look at common sense immigration practices that don’t throw the “baby out with the bath water” as we act? I hope so.” In saying this, you appear to characterize everyone who comments about this young woman’s tragic death in the context of calling for immigration reform as “using” the tragedy for nefarious means, i.e., “hunting down” illegal immigrants. You also characterize these “hunters” as being innately prejudiced against Spanish-speakers or those who are of darker complexion. While there no doubt are people in this country who feel that way, the great majority of Americans calling for strict immigration controls are not prejudiced. We simply want our borders to be controlled, just as you would like to be able to lock your own doors at night in order to restrict access to those whom you might not necessarily welcome into your home.

    1. Thank you. I think you have turned my particularity into generality. I think you have missed the salient points of my article. I have the right to include… or not… the comments that contribute and edify.

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