What Then Shall I Say?

So, I was thinking that in this season of Lent, it is always good to pause for a little self-reflection; some confession; some opportunity to grow and assess our lives.It is kind of like a song blues musician Jonny Lang sings called “Red Light” (follow the link to hear the song)

A chance to breathe 
while sitting at a red light.
You look around 
reflecting on your life.

A chance to think
“Am I drinking too much?
Should I keep going, 
lose the life that I love?
A second glance
when coming to a red light.

So, I was thinking that some reflection on this blog might be in order. First, I have to admit that the idea that anyone – and I mean anyone – would ever think what I say or write would be of any value is a very foreign notion – especially to my Scandinavian side which is steeped in modesty bordering on self-doubt and bears at least a dash of false humility. My Irish side is far less humble, loquacious to a fault but also cynical.  So, I was thinking that I should ask – Do you find these far less than regular ponderings helpful?  Or do you find them just more “blah-blah-blah” calling for your attention from the virtual mailbox?  Do you find what I’m thinking about and sharing relevant to your life? Your faith journey?  If you do… Why?  If you don’t… what would help?

You see, I feel like this particular work of spiritual monologue is still searching for a voice.  I struggle with what to talk about, what is needed, what you might be pondering.  So, maybe you could help and share with me what keeps you awake about God, or this broken world, or believing.  What would you like to hear your pastor, any pastor, or just a guy with his own neuroses, struggles and way too much grad school write about that would help you and your journey with matters of faith and religion?

You can post a comment here or email me at tim@holytrinityankeny.org  Thanks for joining in my Lenten reflection.

Pax Christi,  Tim Olson

5 thoughts on “What Then Shall I Say?

  1. Annie B says:

    I enjoy hearing about lessons the Lord teaches us in the day to day of life. How mistakes, or successes, how they all point to the greater and more important picture – the picture of Jesus! Keep writing!

  2. Gary Neveln says:

    Please keep the words coming Tim. I find it interesting that you used the word ‘monologue’. Were you expecting more interaction? When I started my limerick blog, I certainly did and at first I was disappointed that my posts did not generate more comments. I learned that many of my readers are like me, lurkers on the web, who rarely share or comment. So now I shamelessly self promote it and rejoice at the occasional feedback that I do get.

    http://garysannotatedlimericks.blogspot.com/

  3. Jenny Mahlow says:

    I read your blogs every time. I like to hear your point of view because it makes me feel that I can do better to help others who need help and/or want to be a part of our church ministry.

  4. Steve Duffy says:

    Perhaps you would have time to say more about the Sunday lessons. I am thinking particularly about the relations between the readings, and between Old Testament and New Testament. For many years at Holy Trinity, the Old Testament lessons were rarely preached on, often not even mentioned, on Sunday. Yet the continuities and parallels were important for early Christians and still are important. Possibly you could use the blog for some thoughts that might be too long, or too academic, for the Sunday sermon but still instructive for understanding the lessons.

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